Home > Educational Leadership, Higher Education, Teaching & Learning > America’s Job Surplus and the College Completion Crisis

America’s Job Surplus and the College Completion Crisis

By John M. Bridgeland and Jessica Milano

How can it be that today, in the midst of the most severe economic downturn since the Great Depression and millions of Americans seeking work, that 53 percent of employers — and 67 percent of small business employers that create most new jobs — find it difficult to find qualified workers? How can a workforce desperate for new jobs appear so helpless amid so many businesses desperate to hire?

The answers to those questions lie at the heart of a new divide that has developed within the American economy. Over the last several decades, a chasm has emerged to divide the skills of the nation’s workforce, as they exist, and the demands of the nation’s job market. Today, America has only 45 million workers who have the training and skills to fill 97 million jobs that require some post-secondary education. U.S. companies have to choose among importing skilled workers, outsourcing jobs, or relocating operations in markets overseas with a rising supply of skilled and affordable workers. At the same time, the nation has more than 100 million candidates for only 61 million low-skill, low-wage positions. If America wants to remain competitive, we will have to expand our supply of high- and middle-skill workers.

Continued at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-bridgeland/americas-job-surplus_b_840148.html

Read the report: http://www.civicenterprises.net/pdfs/across-the-great-divide.pdf

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