Home > Educational Leadership, Higher Education > 2011 Survey of Differential Tuition at Public Higher Education Institutions

2011 Survey of Differential Tuition at Public Higher Education Institutions

From Cornell University

American colleges and universities have historically charged the same tuition levels for all of their undergraduate majors (with the exception perhaps of laboratory fees). However, economists have long suggested that academic institutions might plausibly seek to charge different tuition levels for different majors based upon the cost of providing an education in each major and the income earning prospects that the major offers.1 Similarly, institutions might plausibly charge higher tuition levels for students who are further along in their programs, because the cost of educating advanced students (smaller classes) is often higher and because advanced students are more likely to complete their programs and thus to achieve the economic rewards from their programs. Faced with financial cutbacks, a growing number of public academic institutions are adopting differential tuitions by college or major, or by year of enrollment in the program.

Continued at: http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/cheri/upload/2011CHERISurveyFinal0212.pdf

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